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Екатеринбург
Поликлиника, ул. Большакова 95
Стационар, ул. Чайковского 56
287-00-29, 209-09-29
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Medical center “ANGIOLINE” offers a range of varicose vein treatments, including sclerotherapy and Endovenous Ablation of Varicose Veins (endovenous laser therapy (EVLT) and Radiofrequency ablation)  performed by their experienced vascular consultant surgeons. The centre is a private health clinic specialising in day case and minimally invasive treatment and surgery. They offer a range of out-patient clinics with specialist consultants supported by onsite diagnostic and surgical facilities. 

How can varicose veins be treated?

If you suffer from mild varicose veins you may be able to have these treated with sclerotherapy, which involves a simple injection into the affected vein. For patients with more severe cases of varicose veins you can be treated with minimally invasive treatment (Radiofrequency ablation and (or) EVLT) and surgery.

How much does varicose vein treatment cost?

The cost of treatment for varicose veins will vary depending on the severity of your varicose veins and the surgeon you choose. However a rough guide is that laser treatment under a local anaesthetic will cost around 25,000 Roubles (~ $382 USA), Radiofrequency ablation will cost around 35,000 Roubles (~ $535 USA), Sclerotherapy (one session) will cost around 1200 Roubles (~ $18 USA).   

Payment options

We accept all major credit cards 

Where we are?

We are in the central part of Ekaterinburg (map). Ekaterinburg is one of the largest and the most dynamic cities in the country.  It is an administrative capital of the Sverdlovsk Region and the Ural Federal District and an important centre for industry, transport, finance, science and culture. 

Lying in the middle of the Eurasian continent, where Europe meets Asia, the city is located at 60°50' and 55°46' eastern longitude on the eastern slopes of the Ural Ridge on the Iset River.

The city takes up an area of 491 square kilometres. As of 2009 census, Ekaterinburg has a population of 1,401,729 people and ranks fourth in Russia.

Ekaterinburg is two hours ahead of Moscow and 5 hours ahead of Greenwich. The distance between Moscow and Ekaterinburg is 1667 km. A flight from Moscow to Ekaterinburg takes 2 hours, while a train trip takes 25 hours.

Who will carry out my varicose vein treatment?

Medical center “ANGIOLINE” currently has 4 extremely experienced surgeons who are vascular specialists:

Beletsov

Sergey M. Belentsov, MD,Ph.D., Doctor of Science

Also works as a Head of department of Vascular Surgery City Clinic Hospital # 40

He mastered Ultrasound Guided Foam Sclerotherapy (UGFS), Endovenous Laser Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation and all kinds of vascular operations. Member of society of angiologists and vascular surgeons, Russia, since 1995, and American Venous Forum since 2009. By the moment we have the largest experience of UGFS and Radiofrequency Ablation in Russia.

Took part in every annual meeting of Russian Association of Phlebologists, almost always like a presenter. He also took part in 15th World Congress of Union Internationale de Phlebologie (2005, 2009), XXII World Congress of the International Union of Angiology (2006), World Congress of the International Union of Phlebology, Asian Chapter Meeting (2007), European Chapter Meeting (2011), annual Congresses of American Venous Forum (2009, 2010, 2011).

Has more than 80 publications.

Veselov

Boris A. Veselov, MD,Ph.D.

Also works as a Vascular Surgeon of department of Vascular Surgery City Clinic Hospital # 40

He mastered Ultrasound Guided Foam Sclerotherapy (UGFS), Endovenous Laser Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation and all kinds of vascular operations. 

Member of society of angiologists and vascular surgeons, Russia, since 1996

Took part in the most meetings of Russian Association of Phlebologists, almost always like a presenter. Has more than 40 publications.

Chukin

Sergey A. Chukin, MD,Ph.D.

Also works as a Vascular Surgeon of department of Vascular Surgery City Clinic Hospital # 14

He mastered Ultrasound Guided Foam Sclerotherapy (UGFS), Endovenous Laser Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation and all kinds of vascular operations. 

Member of society of angiologists and vascular surgeons, Russia, since 1996

Took part in the most meetings of Russian Association of Phlebologists, almost always like a presenter. 

Has more than 20 publications.

Makarov

Sergey E. Makarov, MD

Also works as a Vascular Surgeon of department of Vascular Surgery City Clinic Hospital # 40

He mastered Ultrasound Guided Foam Sclerotherapy (UGFS), Endovenous Laser Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation and all kinds of vascular operations. Member of society of angiologists and vascular surgeons, Russia, since 1998. Took part in the most meetings of Russian Association of Phlebologists, almost always like a presenter. 

Has more than 15 publications.

How do I book an appointment about my varicose veins?

Simply e-mail on angioline@mc-angio.ru 

Varicose Veins

What are Varicose Veins?

Varicose veins are most often swollen, gnarled veins that most frequently occur in the legs, ankles and feet. They are produced by a condition known as venous insufficiency or venous reflux, in which blood circulating through the lower limbs does not properly return to the heart but instead pools up in the distended veins.

More than 30% of population suffers from venous reflux disease. The symptoms can include pain and fatigue in the legs, swollen ankles and calves, burning or itching skin, skin discoloration and leg ulcers. In less severe cases, thin, discolored vessels – “spider veins” – may be the only symptom.

Gender and age are two primary risk factors in the development of venous reflux. An estimated 70% of women and 40% of men will experience varicose veins symptoms by the time they reach their sixties. Women who have been pregnant more than once and people who are obese, have a family history of varicose veins or spend a great deal of time standing have an elevated risk for the condition, but it can occur in almost anyone at almost any age. Varicose veins never go away without treatment and frequently progress and worsen over time.

Severe varicose veins can have a significant impact on the lives of people who work on their feet – nurses, teachers, flight attendants et al. 

Spider Veins

What are Spider Veins?

Spider veins, also known medically as telangiectasia or venulectasias, are the mildest manifestation of venous insufficiency, similar to varicose veins but smaller. They are small, often tangled groups of tiny blood vessels just under the skin surface that frequently resemble spider webs or tree branches. They are generally red, blue or purple and are clearly visible, usually on the thighs, lower legs and face. Spider veins can sometimes cover large areas of skin, but they are a cosmetic problem only, rarely causing physical symptoms. At least a third of all women and a smaller percentage of men are believed to display the condition.

Spider veins are capillaries, thin vessels directly connected with the larger venous system, and like varicose veins they are caused by venous reflux. Spider veins may be isolated or associated with "feeder" veins or with larger underlying varicose veins, but they are not varicose veins – they do not bulge above the skin surface and do not require medical treatment. 

Spider veins can be diagnosed merely by sight. They tend to take on one of three characteristic patterns – a "sunburst" or spider-web pattern radiating outward from a central point, a "tree-branch" pattern, or a "matting" or linear pattern that may be nothing more than a set of thin lines. Even in the absence of physical discomfort, some physicians observing spider veins prefer to conduct ultrasound exams to determine the extent of the problem and the underlying causes of the condition. 

Risk factors for spider veins are similar to those for varicose veins – age, heredity, pregnancy, hormonal changes, obesity and extended periods of standing – as well as sun exposure, particularly in fair-skinned people, and injuries to the skin surface. Some physicians believe that exercise, weight loss and the wearing of support hose and flat shoes instead of high heels can reduce the incidence of spider veins.

Spider vein treatments are non-invasive or minimally invasive and include sclerotherapy and laser procedures. They are considered cosmetic procedures and are not covered by health insurance or Medicare unless a more serious underlying condition is diagnosed. 

Treatment

Venous insufficiency resulting from superficial reflux because of varicose veins is a serious problem that usually progresses inexorably if left untreated. When the refluxing circuit involves failure of the primary valves at the saphenofemoral junction, treatment options for the patient are limited, and early recurrences are the rule rather than the exception. 

In the historical surgical approach, ligation and division of the saphenous trunk and all proximal tributaries are followed either by stripping of the vein or by avulsion phlebectomy. Proximal ligation requires a substantial incision at the groin crease. Stripping of the vein requires additional incisions at the knee or below and is associated with a high incidence of minor surgical complications. Avulsion phlebectomy requires multiple 2- to 3-mm incisions along the course of the vein and can cause damage to adjacent nerves and lymphatic vessels. 

Endovenous ablation has replaced stripping and ligation as the technique for elimination of saphenous vein reflux. One of the endovenous techniques is a radiofrequency-based procedure. Newer methods of delivery of radiofrequency were introduced in 2007. Endovenous procedures are far less invasive than surgery and have lower complication rates. The procedure is well tolerated by patients, and it produces good cosmetic results. Excellent clinical results are seen at 4-5 years, and the long-term efficacy of the procedure is now known with 10 years of experience. The original radiofrequency endovenous procedure was cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 1999. 

Endovenous techniques (endovenous laser therapy, radiofrequency ablation, and endovenous foam sclerotherapy) clearly are less invasive and are associated with fewer complications compared with more invasive surgical procedures, with comparable or greater efficacy. 

What are the limitations of Endovenous Ablation of Varicose Veins?

Ablation catheters cannot be easily passed through a tortuous vein, or a vessel with many turns and bends. Consequently, the procedure is typically used to treat larger varicose veins, such as the great saphenous vein, which extends from the groin down the inside of the thigh into the inner calf.

Endovenous ablation is successful at closing the abnormal target vein almost 100 percent of the time, but small dilated branches that persist in the skin often require additional treatment with phlebectomy (minor surgical procedure to extract them) or sclerotherapy (injection of a liquid medication to seal them off). Subsequent treatments are usually scheduled after an ablation procedure.

What are the benefits vs. risks?

Benefits
  • No surgical incision is needed—only a small nick in the skin that does not have to be stitched closed.
  • When compared with traditional vein stripping techniques, endovenous ablation is more effective, has fewer complications, and is associated with much less pain during recovery.
  • Endovenous ablation is generally complication-free and safe.
  • This procedure leaves virtually no scars because catheter placement requires skin openings of only a few millimeters, not large incisions.
  • Endovenous ablation offers a less invasive alternative to standard surgery.
  • Most of the veins treated are effectively invisible even to ultrasound 12 months after the procedure.
  • Most patients report symptom relief and are able to return to normal daily activities immediately, with little or no pain
Risks
  • Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries a risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in 1,000.
  • Any procedure that involves placement of a catheter inside a blood vessel carries certain risks. These risks include damage to the blood vessel, bruising or bleeding at the puncture site, and infection.
  • Some postoperative bruising and tenderness may occur, but may be alleviated by wearing a compression stocking.
  • Some instances of thermal (heat) damage to nerves have been reported. This is rare and generally goes away in a short time.
  • Thrombophlebitis (inflammation of the vein) is not uncommon and may cause pain and redness over the treated area, but generally responds well to nonsteroidial anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Blood clots that formed in the veins can travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism); however, this is an extremely rare occurrence.
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